*SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING*

Jane Meredeth Adams
Credit: Alison Yin for EdSource

*Twitter Post: Dr. Pedro Noguera*

July 17, 2017

A new review of studies from around the world found that students who were taught positive social skills at school reported higher levels of those skills months and even years afterward, compared to their peers who were not taught those skills.

The long-term benefits of social and emotional learning appeared regardless of the students’ economic or racial background or the rural, suburban or city location of the school, according to the meta-analysis published this month in the journal Child Development. Social and emotional learning is an organized approach to teaching students personal skills, including how to identify emotions, empathize with others and resolve conflicts.

Four researchers affiliated with the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning, a Chicago-based organization that promotes social and emotional learning, analyzed 82 studies that tracked students who had participated in youth development programs that included social and emotional skill-building.

The majority of the follow-up studies looked at student attitudes, feelings and behaviors. But eight of the studies tracked academic results for a period that averaged 3.75 years. Participants in social and emotional learning activities performed about 13 percent higher in grades and test scores than their peers, the study found.

Was the increase in test scores caused by social and emotional learning interventions? “You really can’t say that for sure,” said study co-author Joseph Durlak, a senior research scientist at the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning and an emeritus professor of psychology at Loyola University Chicago. It’s an area for further study, he said.

“Signed…An Educated Brother!”

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Teaching Students to De-Stress Over Testing

LINK: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2017/05/24/teaching-students-to-de-stress-over-testing.html

Third graders participate in a 15-minute mindfulness session in their classroom at Andrews Elementary.

Third graders participate in a 15-minute mindfulness session in their classroom at Andrews Elementary.
—Tamir Kalifa for Education Week

Some districts are taking steps to help students better cope with test anxiety and other stresses of school

May 24, 2017
“Signed…An Educated Brother!”
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The College of Westchester-May 24th

High School Junior Career Expo

Up Close and Informational

For more information, call 914.831.0200
When: May 24, 2017
Time: 10:00am – 2:00pm
Location: The College of Westchester
325 Central Avenue
White Plains, New York 10606 

Experience a dynamic presentation to help you determine your career personality!

  • Learn about career in interactive sessions
  • Connect with CW students from all majors
  • Meet our faculty
  • Enjoy lunch!

Bring your transcript to find out about acceptance and scholarships.

 

“Signed…An Educated Brother”

 

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Umbrellas Don’t Make it Rain: Why Studying and Working Hard Isn’t Enough for Black Americans

file:///C:/Users/Charles/Desktop/Umbrellas-Dont-Make-It-Rain8.pdf

Darrick Hamilton
William Darity, Jr.
Anne E. Price
Vishnu Sridharan
Rebecca Tippett

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A Persistent Divide: New Federal Data Explore Education Disparities

The labor supply of low social status, docile and cheap, can be maintained in subjection only by systematic degradation and by deliberate efforts to suppress its intelligence. Capitalism & Slavery, Eric Williams, The University of North Carolina Press, 1944

A deep gulf between the educational experiences of traditionally disadvantaged student groups and their peers on a broad range of indicators persists in U.S. public schools, according to new federal data. Here are some major highlights from the latest Civil Rights Data Collection—data on more than 50 million students collected from more than 99 percent of public schools and districts in the country during the 2013-14 school year.
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School Discipline
The number of K-12 students who received at least one out-of-school suspension dropped by nearly 20 percent since the 2011-12 school year, but disparities persist.
• 6 percent of all K-12 students were suspended in 2013-14. The suspension rate was 18 percent for black boys, 10 percent for black girls, 5 percent for white boys, and 2 percent for white girls.
• American Indian or Alaska Native, Latino, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, and multiracial boys are also disproportionately suspended from school, representing 15% of K-12 students but 19% of K-12 students receiving one or more out-of-school suspensions.
• Students with disabilities served by IDEA are more than twice as likely to receive one or more out-of-school suspensions as students without disabilities.
• Black boys represent 8% of all students, but 19% of students expelled without educational services.
• Black children made up 19 percent of preschool enrollment, but 47 percent of suspended preschool children. By comparison, white children made up 41 percent of enrollment but 28 percent of children suspended.
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Access to Advanced Coursework
High-level math and science classes were not universally, or equally, offered in the nation’s high schools in 2013-14.
• 33% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment* offer calculus, compared to 56% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.
• 48% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment* offer physics, compared to 67% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.
• 65% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment* offer chemistry, compared to 78% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.
• 71% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment* offer Algebra II, compared to 84% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.
• Black and Latino students represent 38% of students in schools that offer AP courses, but 29% of students enrolled in at least one Advance Placement course.
* “High/low black and Latino student enrollment” refers to schools with more than 75 percent and less than 25 percent black and Latino student enrollment, respectively.
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Chronic Student Absenteeism
About 13 percent of all U.S. students—more than 6 million—missed at least 15 days of school in the 2013-14 school year.
• 20% or more of American Indian or Alaska Native (26%), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (25%), black (22%), multiracial (21%), and Latino (20%) high school students are chronically absent.
• High school students with disabilities served by IDEA are 1.3 times as likely to be chronically absent as high school students without disabilities.
• 20% of all English-language-learner high school students are chronically absent.

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Teacher Absenteeism
Nationally, 27 percent of pre-K-12 teachers were absent for more than 10 school days in the 2013-14 school year.

Sources: U.S. Department of Education and Education Week Research Center
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Teacher/Staffing Equity
Black, Latino, and American Indian or Alaska Native students are more likely to attend schools with higher concentrations of inexperienced teachers.
• 11% of black students, 9% of Latino students, and 7% of American Indian or Alaska Native students attend schools where more than 20% of teachers are in their first year of teaching, compared to 5% of white students and 4% of Asian students.
• 10% of teachers in schools with high black and Latino student enrollment* are in their first year of teaching, compared to 5% of teachers in schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.

Sources: Civil Rights Data Collection and U.S. Department of Education

“Signed…An Educated Brother!”

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And Everybody Knows The Truth…We Just Keep On Pushing!!!

IN HONOR OF WE PEOPLE WHO ARE DARKER THAN BLUE

We’re A Winner
And Never Let Anybody Say
Boy, You Can’t Make It
Cause Some People’s Mind Is In Your Way
No More Tears Do We Cry,
The Black Boy Done Dried His Eyes,
Cause We’re Moving On Up, Moving On Up
Lord Have Mercy, We’re Moving On Up Now, Moving On Up
They’ll Be No More Uncle Tom
Unless That Blessed Day Has Come
And We’re A Winner, And Everybody Knows The Truth
We’ll Just Keep On Pushing, Like Martin Luther Told You To
And I Don’t Mind Leaving Here, To Show The World We Have No Fear
Cause We’re Moving On Up, Moving On Up, Lord Have Mercy We’re Moving On Up
We’re Moving On Up
So People Get Ready, I’ve Got Good News For You
How We Got Over, Like We’re All Suppose To Do
Let Us All Say A-Men, And Together We’ll Clap Our Hands
Cause We’re Moving On Up, Moving On Up
Lord Have Mercy We’re Moving On Up Now, Moving On Up!!!

Curtis Mayfield, Curtis/Live! (Live @ Bitter End, NYC), Buddah Records, 1971

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Education Week Examines The Teaching Profession

African-American men like Chrissell Rhone make up just 2 percent of U.S. teachers and, for many of them, school can be a lonely place.

 

 

 

 

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